2020 VISIONS – BEACONS OF HOPE IN TRONGATE WINDOWS

2020 VISIONS – BEACONS OF HOPE IN TRONGATE WINDOWS

A series of installations from Nich Smith Lighting Design – 2020 Visions – runs from 12 – 20 December 2020.

While closed to the public, Tron Theatre is working on a series of innovative projects, funded through the Scottish Government’s Performing Arts Venue Relief Fund that will present dramatic content in unconventional settings. The first of these, 2020 Visions from Nich Smith Lighting Design is a participatory work that asks what the future holds for our city centre community when high streets are changing, office blocks are emptying, and shops may be closing.

Opening at dusk on Saturday 12 December 2020 Visions asks what the future of our neighbourhoods will be and presents it as a series of scenes in nine sites around the Tron Theatre. Street-level windows have been taken over with installations inspired by the stories and ideas of local people who have contributed to the project online and through social media by sharing their hopes and dreams for the future. Part promenade, part treasure hunt, part collective dream, 2020 Visions invites passers-by, city-dwellers, shoppers and neighbours alike to reflect and imagine a brighter future during the darkest week of the winter.
2020-visions
A core feature of 2020 Visions is to collaborate with emerging artists from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds. Visual artists Sekai Machache, Samuel Temple, and Saoirse Anis joined with the 2020 Visions team of theatre technicians, lighting designers, and set designers in a creative mash-up which has produced curious and playful artworks in response to the question “What does our future hold?” Visions have been reflective, resonant, thought-provoking, and fun.

As the days get shorter and night comes earlier, 2020 Visions has populated empty spaces with light and re-animated the Trongate neighbourhood with hope.

2020 Visions, which is being delivered with support from City Property LLP, will light up nine sites around the Trongate, including the Tron Theatre, from dusk to 9pm daily from 12–20 December.

For more information contact:
Lindsay Mitchell, Head of Marketing & Communications lindsay.mitchell@tron.co.uk

FINAL WEEK FOR ST ENOCH DRF CONSULTATION

FINAL WEEK FOR ST ENOCH DRF CONSULTATION

You only have seven days left to have your say on the St Enoch District Regeneration Framework (DRF) as public consultation ends 6 September. You can download the St Enoch District Regeneration Framework document here.

There are seven themes identified, a number of strategic aims and project activities for the area. There are two questions that we would like as much feedback as we can on this DRF. Firstly, do you think we have identified the right priorities for the area? Secondly, do you agree with the actions on how to deliver the DRF? If not, please let us know what you think.

The themes identified from this DRF vary, from activating the riverside, to how we design streets and spaces, making them more pedestrian-friendly, to a shift towards a more efficient, healthy and sustainable mobility and for the ambition to create a vibrant area. Feedback will be fed into the proposals before they are finally approved and become a set of actions which need to be delivered – so please have your say.

Have your say at Glasgow City Council’s Consultation Hub.

(Y)OUR GREAT STREETS AND SPACES: PLEASE COMMENT ON THE ST ENOCH PROPOSALS

(Y)OUR GREAT STREETS AND SPACES: PLEASE COMMENT ON THE ST ENOCH PROPOSALS

The St Enoch area is often referred to as being car-dominated, secluded, as well as lacking in street life and activity. Argyle Street and St Enoch Square attract the highest footfall for the area, however, there is scope for improvement. There is also a lack of green spaces throughout the area, with many consultees observing that many of the streets are unattractive. It is imperative that this area, where the heart of the city meets its river, becomes a more prominent destination and to become more attractive, additional quality public spaces are needed. Consequently, this will attract new investment and will entice new inhabitants.

To achieve this, key streets like Argyle Street, Ballater Street, Jamaica Street and the quays will be revived as attractive public spaces with diverse characteristics. Moreover, one or two new routes will be made through St Enoch Shopping Centre, allowing pedestrians to walk directly from the city centre to the river quay, revitalising the currently overlooked areas of St Enoch.

In addition, the project aims to create an events space in the heart of St Enoch with the aspiration that this will become a new visitor attraction to the area. The City Centre currently has various spaces used for events. However, there would appear to be a demand for a more flexible, contemporary event space that relieves pressure on George Square. A new event plaza (as well as the River Park) could accommodate seasonal and commercial events including Christmas fairs/markets, art fairs or street sports tournaments. This will allow George Square to become less commercialised and dedicated to civic ceremonies, public gatherings and protests.

Now you can have your say:
The St Enoch DRF formally went live on 14th June and remains available for comment until 6th September. You can access the document and the GCC Consultation Hub via the following links:

Draft St Enoch Regeneration Framework Document
Glasgow City Council’s Consultation Hub

Please let us know what you think.

ST ENOCH DISTRICT REGENERATION FRAMEWORK –  UPDATE

ST ENOCH DISTRICT REGENERATION FRAMEWORK – UPDATE

The history of St Enoch Square is indicative and reflective of the development of the wider district in which it sits. Originally the western boundary of Glasgow Green with strong links to the River Clyde and the reputed burial site of St Thenew (St Enoch), over the years this area has variously been a car park, a religious site, a glass-works and a major transport hub, to name but a few. It has been a place of quiet introspection, a pasture for sheep grazing, a meeting place for farmers, and a busy retail centre. It has passed through various owners and has been home to a church, a train station, a hotel, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow. For many years it was a simple green space of grass and shrubs but eventually became one of the first locations in the city to experience electrical light. It has been party to huge construction works and equally massive demolitions.

In short, St Enoch Square has been many different things to many different people through the ages. It continues to be an important part of Glasgow city centre and remains the heart of the St Enoch district. Now, as we investigate how spaces like this can be best utilised going forward, it’s important that we receive the views and opinions of the people who will be experiencing it now and in the future.

St Enoch DRF formally went live on 14th June and remains available for comment until 6th September. You can access the document and the GCC Consultation Hub via the following links:

Draft St Enoch Regeneration Framework Document

Consultation comment form

Please let us know what you think.

(Y)OUR RIVER PARK: YOUR CHANCE TO COMMENT ON THE PROPOSALS FOR ST ENOCH.

(Y)OUR RIVER PARK: YOUR CHANCE TO COMMENT ON THE PROPOSALS FOR ST ENOCH.

Glasgow is a city well renowned for its green spaces and is often referred to as the Dear Green Place. However, the city centre itself lacks such spaces. The St Enoch and Broomielaw District Regeneration Frameworks (DRFs) hope to address this, by creating a river park along the River Clyde.

The Clyde side at the moment is dominated by the car, making it unattractive to pedestrians and cyclists. As a result of this, public space in this area is inadequate for a modern 21st-century city. Consequently, the aim is to provide continuous safe ‘car-free’ routes for pedestrians and cyclists. In addition, provision of long distance linear promenade is a crucial element of (Y)our River Park.

The aim is to create a River Clyde Linear park, from Glasgow Green to the River Kelvin, making it the biggest and most vibrant park in Glasgow. The ambition for the River Park is for it to become the attraction of the city centre, full of amenity spaces such as green and water recreation play spaces, sports tracks and fields for all ages and a social/events space. Moreover, the river should become a nationally significant destination that attracts international visitors, making it a natural hub for socialising and leisure. As a result of this, the area should attract high footfall and the river can once again be at the heart and soul of the city.

Again tackling the inaccessibility of the River, improvements to bridge connections will be considered. Strengthening the pedestrian and cycle connection of River Clyde South Bank and North Bank by introducing an intermediate bridge between the Squiggly Bridge (Tradeston) and the Squinty Bridge (Clyde Arc) will be investigated, as well as additional bridge crossings. Moreover, additional connections will better connect neighbourhoods on each side of the River and will encourage positive developments.

Now you can have your say:

The St Enoch District Regeneration Framework (DRF) is now out for public consultation and this is your chance to have your input on the DRF, highlighting which themes you think will benefit the city or vice versa. Please see attached links below for St Enoch DRF and St Enoch DRF public consultation:

Download the Draft St Enoch DRF Report
Tell us what you think

ST ENOCH DISTRICT REGENERATION FRAMEWORK – UPDATE

ST ENOCH DISTRICT REGENERATION FRAMEWORK – UPDATE

The St Enoch District Regeneration Framework (DRF) follows on from similar documents previously generated for both the Sauchiehall & Garnethill, and Broomielaw districts. As such it identifies a number of different strategic aims and project activities for the area. Like the Broomielaw document before it, St Enoch DRF is also strongly associated with the regeneration of the River Clyde and references the theme of (Y)our River Park.

Additionally, it also includes the themes of (Y)our Great Streets & Spaces, (Y)our Updated Mobility, (Y)our Great Buildings, (Y)our Vibrant St Enoch, as well as Transforming (Y)our St Enoch. Each of these different elements contributes towards the overall ambition for the district and, in the same way, each DRF contributes to the wider aspirations for the city centre and, by extension, Glasgow.

Consequently, given the potential impact of these proposals, it is so important that as many people as possible take the opportunity to read over these vision documents and understand what is planned. More importantly, it is an opportunity for you to provide your comments and inform the conversation going forward.

St Enoch DRF formally went live on 14th June and remains available for comment until 6th September. You can access the document and the GCC Consultation Hub via the following links:

Draft St Enoch DRF Document

GCC Consultation Page

Please let us know what you think.