GEORGE SQUARE SERVICING SURVEY

GEORGE SQUARE SERVICING SURVEY

Glasgow City Council is exploring plans to close off the East and West sides of George Square to traffic as a first step towards achieving the recommendations of the public engagement on the future of the Square, which took place in October 2019.

The Council is also evaluating the removal of parking around the square and private car traffic from the southern arterial route.

A Servicing Survey is being conducted around George Square with a view to gaining a better understanding of the service requirements of the businesses that are in close proximity of the Square. The results will help inform future decisions on traffic management around George Square.

Please participate in the survey by clicking the link below:

https://survey123.arcgis.com/share/375b5a92285649ac829991a557a1a62c

Surveys should be filled in by local businesses by Thursday 30 January 2020.

CENTRAL DISTRICT REGENERATION FRAMEWORK PUBLIC CONSULTATION LIVE

CENTRAL DISTRICT REGENERATION FRAMEWORK PUBLIC CONSULTATION LIVE

Consultation is underway on regeneration plans for Glasgow’s Central District
Glasgow City Council has considered a report on a draft regeneration strategy for the Central District of the city centre and approved a 10-week public consultation on the draft strategy which went live on 06/12/2019. So now is your opportunity to have your say regarding the future of Glasgow’s Central District. We have already received a number of responses over the festive period but we would like to encourage as many people as possible to get involved.

Each of the nine districts in Glasgow city centre has or will have a District Regeneration Framework (DRF) – essentially, a plan for short, medium and long-term actions to be delivered that will bring economic, environmental and social improvements to the area.  The DRFs are created with input from local communities, organisations and a wide range of stakeholders, both internal and external.

The draft Central DRF (CDRF) is the fourth of the nine city centre districts, and has been developed in collaboration with a multi-disciplinary team led by Austin-Smith: Lord and MVRDV, and informed by consultations in the area and online.  This consultation period sees a further opportunity for local parties to make their views known. The final Central DRF and Action Plan will be produced after the end of the consultation period.

The process of developing this draft DRF investigated the Central district’s strengths, potential, opportunities and challenges: the district lies at the heart of the city centre and is key to all the surrounding districts, it contains the city’s leading retail quarter and much public transport provision – but is still dominated by the car with a corresponding impact on public space.

Five key themes have emerged from the Central DRF:

  • (Y)our Great Streets and Spaces: this theme seeks to respond to the car and bus dominated character of the district and address the shortage of quality green and public spaces. Broken connections and gaps in the urban form need to be addressed throughout the district and investment in public spaces and the physical environment is essential. It also focuses on connection and re-connection to further develop the diverse and distinctive character in the CDRF;
  • (Y)our Updated Mobility: this incorporates proposals to enhance the city centre’s public transport and active travel networks to create a sustainable, walkable city, and will include a review of the City Centre Transport Strategy in the context of the CDRF objectives and the recommendations of the Connectivity Commission;
  • (Y)our Vibrant Central: this theme explores ways to address the lack of local neighbourhood amenities which might prevent people from choosing to live within the Central District area. It is therefore important that increased community infrastructure should accompany increased city centre residential development and achieve higher densities of working populations. Not only should the locations of attractions and destinations inform the alignment of key routes across the city centre but the city centre should become more lively, with more night-time economy, more viable amenities, better connections to the existing cultural and creative infrastructure  and a more sustainable, walkable and activated district;
  • (Y)our Great Buildings: this theme seeks to ensure that Glasgow’s historic fine built heritage is protected and that it continues to be recognised as some of the greatest urban architecture in the UK. Consequently, it is imperative that new developments respect this legacy whilst striving to achieve the highest quality in contemporary design.
  • Transforming (Y)our Central: this focuses on the creation of agile policies and shared objectives to attract investment, secure funding and foster collaborative working in the district. Transforming this district cannot however be delivered by the Council alone; this must be a truly collaborative partnership between all stakeholders. Despite the lack of public ownership, GCC will look to identify and work with partners to develop masterplan strategies for both sides of the river.

The purpose of this public consultation is to signify support for specific projects and to determine which actions from this DRF should be prioritised. The public consultation will run from 6th December 2019 – 14 February 2020 and interested parties can participate via an online survey, by email or by post.

A summary report of the draft Central DRF can be found here

The Central DRF Public Consultation can be found here

If approved, the Central DRF would become supplementary guidance for the City Development Plan – thus shaping the future development of the Central District.

PAST, PRESENT, POSSIBLE 2

PAST, PRESENT, POSSIBLE 2

Past, Present, Possible 2 officially launched on 30th November by WaveParticle. The event was a great success, with over 250 people attending throughout. The highlight was the video, which showcased all the hard-working people of the High Street / Saltmarket area giving their views on the street, why they picked this area to start their businesses and what they hope for the future of the area. The participants ranged from independent businesses that have been working on the street for years, to more recent start-ups. The overall feedback was encouraging, with many hoping for more positive changes to the area as part of the High Street Area Strategy.

Please see link below to watch the video on Vimeo and view or download the High Street Area Strategy here.

 

CITY CENTRE LIVING STRATEGY (CCLS)

CITY CENTRE LIVING STRATEGY (CCLS)

The Glasgow City Centre Strategy 2014-19 (CCS 2014-19) was approved in 2013 with an ambitious 55 actions aimed at attracting investment, development and footfall. These actions ranged from large-scale sector/area strategies and frameworks that each comprise a number of sub-projects, plans and policies, to smaller-scale initiatives that targeted specific thematic issues. One key issue identified at an early stage of the CCS 2014-19 was the need to increase Glasgow city centre’s residential population.

Population density is deemed increasingly important in a sustainable city centre. It creates efficiencies with public services and generates demand for local goods and services. Glasgow appears to lag behind other cities in respective of population density (beyond the student population), with comparator city centres pushing ahead in terms of relative growth.

The CCLS Vision is to create a diverse, inclusive and sustainable city centre population. The strategy has a proposed action plan of six key objectives that will double Glasgow’s city centre population by around 20,000 by 2035.

The CCLS responds to the topics and opportunities raised through this process and builds on the fertile substratum of the city centre, its compact urban form, architectural and heritage richness, economic framework, and the renewed interest in city living demonstrated by younger generations. The CCLS was approved by the Council to proceed to public consultation in December. The objective of this consultation is to gather opinion on proposed actions under the following objectives:
– Population
– Vacant Commercial Space
– Environment
– Quality in Design
– Investment
– Resilient Neighbourhoods

The intention is to develop and implement agreed, short, medium and long term actions in collaboration with the local community and stakeholders. By doing this, it is anticipated that the city centre will be able to maximise its liveability, attract new residents and investment.

Click here for the City Centre Living Strategy Survey Report

CENTRAL DISTRICT REGENERATION FRAMEWORK: PUBLIC CONSULTATION

CENTRAL DISTRICT REGENERATION FRAMEWORK: PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Consultation is to begin on regeneration plan for Glasgow’s Central District
Glasgow City Council has considered a report on a draft regeneration strategy for the Central District of the city centre and approved a 10-week public consultation on the draft strategy which goes live today (06/12/2019).

Each of the nine districts in Glasgow city centre has or will have a District Regeneration Framework (DRF) – essentially, a plan for short, medium and long-term actions to be delivered that will bring economic, environmental and social improvements to the area.  The DRFs are created with input from local communities, organisations and a wide range of stakeholders.

The draft Central DRF is the fourth of the nine for the city centre districts, and has been developed in collaboration with a multi-disciplinary team led by Austin-Smith: Lord and MVRDV, and informed by consultations in the area and online.  The consultation period sees a further opportunity for local parties to make their views known, and the final Central DRF and Action Plan will be produced after the end of the consultation period.

The process of developing this draft DRF found the Central district’s strengths, potential, opportunities and challenges: the district lies at the heart of the city centre and is key to all the surrounding districts, it contains the city’s leading retail quarter and much public transport provision – but is still dominated by the car and the subsequent impact on public space.

Five key themes have emerged from the Central DRF:

  • (Y)our Great Streets and Spaces: this theme seeks to respond to the car and bus dominated character of the district and address the shortage of quality green and public spaces. Broken connections and gaps in the urban form need to be addressed throughout the district and investment in public spaces and the physical environment is essential. It also focuses on connection and re-connection to further develop the diverse and distinctive character in the CDRF;
  • (Y)our Updated Mobility: this incorporates proposals to enhance the city centre’s public transport and active travel networks to create a sustainable, walkable city, and will include a review of the City Centre Transport Strategy in the context of the CDRF objectives and the recommendations of the Connectivity Commission;
  • (Y)our Vibrant Central: this theme explores ways to address the lack of local neighbourhood amenities which might prevent people from choosing to live within the Central District area. It is therefore important that increased community infrastructure should accompany increased city centre residential development and achieve higher densities of working populations. Not only should the locations of attractions and destinations inform the alignment of key routes across the city centre but the city centre should become more lively, with more night-time economy, more viable amenities, better connections to the existing cultural and creative infrastructure  and a more sustainable, walkable and activated district;
  • (Y)our Great Buildings: this theme seeks to ensure that Glasgow’s historic fine built heritage is protected and that it continues to be recognised as some of the greatest urban architecture in the UK. Consequently, it is imperative that new developments respect this legacy whilst striving to achieve the highest quality in contemporary design.
  • Transforming (Y)our Central: this focuses on the creation of agile policies and shared objectives to attract investment, secure funding and foster collaborative working in the district. Transforming this district cannot however be delivered by the Council alone; this must be a truly collaborative partnership between all stakeholders. Despite the lack of public ownership, GCC will look to identify and work with partners to develop masterplan strategies for both sides of the river.

The aim of the public consultation is to establish support for specific projects, and to determine which actions should be prioritised.  The public consultation will run from 6 December – 14 February, and those interested can take part through an online survey, by email and by post.

A summary report of the draft Central DRF can be found here: https://www.glasgow.gov.uk/CHttpHandler.ashx?id=47161.

The Central DRF Public Consultation can be found here:https://www.glasgowconsult.co.uk/KMS/dmart.aspx?strTab=PublicDMartCurrent

If approved, the Central DRF would become supplementary guidance for the City Development Plan – thus shaping the future development of the Central District.

PAST, PRESENT, POSSIBLE 2 LAUNCH EVENT

PAST, PRESENT, POSSIBLE 2 LAUNCH EVENT

Past, Present, Possible 2 will officially launch this weekend with an event on 30 November 2019.

This event will take place on St Andrews Street between 5 – 8pm. It is a unique outdoor screening of a film by WAVEparticle that celebrates the oldest line in the City – featuring a reflection on the rich history of High Street and Saltmarket, alongside portraits of, and interviews with, people who live and work on the street, exploring ideas of how to help make this a great line through the area compromising the eight original streets of the city. Everyone is welcome!

Refreshments will be provided by Brave Bakers and Obsession of India.

Past, Present, Possible is part of the High Street Area Strategy and the launch event is the start of a conversation on how we can view the street creatively. If you want to get involved in the future of the project please email [email protected]

Pat Present Possible Flyer