WRITING THE NEXT CHAPTER IN GLASGOW’S REGENERATION STORY

WRITING THE NEXT CHAPTER IN GLASGOW’S REGENERATION STORY

Here is the fourth blog in a series that discusses different aspects of the ongoing (Y)our City Centre District Regeneration Frameworks. Here Dr Mark Robertson, Managing Partner of Ryden considers the property market context for Glasgow post-Covid and post-Brexit.

Ryden is delighted to once again contribute to Austin Smith:Lord’s regeneration frameworks for Glasgow city centre. Our role is to bring property market optimism, with a healthy dose of realism, to plans to continue the successful regeneration of the city centre.

I would argue that Glasgow already has the strongest regeneration story among the UK’s regional cities, including ‘Manctopia’. From the peripheral housing estates inwards to the Transformational Regeneration Areas, Clyde Gateway, the waterfront to date and Clyde Mission and City Deal now and for the future – these are not simply physical projects but have embedded strong socio-economics and increasing environmental benefits. In the core city centre, there is no question that Glasgow’s Central Business – and shopping, eating and drinking – District is post-regeneration and a great success, although it will benefit from more residents and some better spaces between buildings.

The four areas we are now analysing are part of this defined city centre. They have established populations, great civic value and anchor institutions such as the universities and hospital – in total a remarkable 15,000 properties. But, at the outer edges, they can each appear unloved and rather remote from the city centre proper. It is a short walk but can feel like a long way from Buchanan Street to parts of Cowcaddens, Townhead and the inner east end. The wider context matters too, as the fast-improving north (Port Dundas and Sighthill), inner East End and south push inwards – creating the prospects for these Districts to be urban bridges between the core city centre and the wider conurbation.

The property markets we work with have undergone massive change: we are now working post-privatisation (a long time ago, in the 1980s and 90s), post-Global Financial Crisis (2008) and very soon post-Brexit and hopefully post-COVID. This context matters: property markets are ever-more risk-averse and prefer to invest in the best locations for the most valuable occupiers – branded hotels, leisure, shops and office occupiers such as government, banks and utilities. These major occupiers are attracted to Glasgow and bring great investment benefits. But, in the coming market, there are likely to be fewer of them. The city centre must continue to target and win this prime investment where possible, but now also turn to its puzzling long term vacancies, under-used buildings and gap sites and the city centre edges – if it is to continue to grow and improve its offer to the broadest possible mix of residents, businesses and visitors.

As demonstrated by the regeneration programmes noted above, Glasgow has never lost its capacity to tackle market challenges. It still can and does face into areas requiring planning, early funding and market support. The city will need all of these skills and its celebrated optimism to deliver the potential of the four Districts, but now is the time and these are the places to build the platform for that change.

Bio
Mark is Managing Partner of Ryden. He has led many notable property consultancy projects in Glasgow, including the city centre strategy, Transformational Regeneration Areas, Clyde Gateway regeneration, International Financial Services District, Clyde Waterfront and, with Austin Smith:Lord, the city centre Districts Regeneration Frameworks. Mark has edited Ryden’s Scottish Property Review for 27 years, is on the policy boards of SPF and SCDI, is a fellow of the RICS and teaches MSc property investment appraisal.

(Y)OUR PLACE MATTERS

(Y)OUR PLACE MATTERS

Work continues with the development of District Regeneration Frameworks (DRFs) for Cowcaddens, Townhead, Learning Quarter and Merchant City.

The process seeks to engage with as many stakeholders as possible. Austin-Smith:Lord is leading the process. In doing this, the project team will get the clearest picture of the opportunities and priorities for the areas. They will also see how these relate to the short, medium and long-term context.

If you want to be part of this exciting process, go to https://yourcitycentre2020.commonplace.is/ and let us know what you think.

We are working with Glasgow Chamber of Commerce to help with these conversations and to hear what people think. They recently hosted a meeting to discuss Sustaining Glasgow City Centres Green Recovery. The session was recorded and is available here.

The conversation was interesting. It featured lots of themes such as usable green spaces, active travel and the commitment by Glasgow City Council to be carbon neutral by 2030. Another topic was how the city centre could stay as a thriving place that is attractive to an increasing number of residents, businesses and visitors.

Take the time to get in touch – it is (Y)our City Centre.

(Y)OUR CITY CENTRE – ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES

(Y)OUR CITY CENTRE – ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Cowcaddens, Townhead, Learning Quarter and Merchant City

It is time to let us know what you think the key issues and opportunities are for some or all the districts we are creating District Regeneration Frameworks for. You can contact yourcitycentre2020.commonplace.is/  and leave as many comments as you wish or you can call us  0800 1583973. This number is live on the following dates/times: Thursday 2 July, noon – 2pm, 5 – 7pm, Saturday 4 July, 10am – noon. We will add other dates as the project develops. This will give those without online access the chance to share their ideas.

We are really keen to hear your views on how it can be made easier to get around the city centre; how streets and open spaces can be improved; and hear thoughts on housing and places to work and learn, and on the mix of activities required to create a thriving, active city centre in the future. The city centre plays a key role for the whole of Glasgow as well as the surrounding region beyond it, so thoughts on connectivity are also welcome.

The consultation and engagement process for the four districts will have two main phases. This one is to find out what people think the key priorities, issues and opportunities are for each or all the districts. The second will happen later this year when the team will work with stakeholders to develop ideas that will feed into the action plans.

A DRF is a 10-year regeneration planning framework and action plan, and each DRF will guide the city centre’s physical, social and economic regeneration. The DRFs support both Glasgow’s City Development Plan and the City Centre Strategy.

The council recently appointed a team to help prepare ambitious regeneration action plans for these four districts you can find about more about them and the strategy as a whole at [email protected] and [email protected]

Please make the time to make on comments on-line or phone us on the dates and times listed above.

THE NEXT (PHASE 3) DISTRICT REGENERATION FRAMEWORKS

THE NEXT (PHASE 3) DISTRICT REGENERATION FRAMEWORKS

Glasgow City Council has appointed a multidisciplinary team of local and international consultants to prepare for the next phase of our City Centre District Regeneration Frameworks (DRFs).

Austin-Smith-Lord will lead the team, in partnership with Rotterdam based urbanists Studio for New Realities, WAVEparticle and will also draw upon the expertise of Urban Movement and Civic Engineers. The four districts for phase 3 of the DRFs are Cowcaddens, Townhead, the “Learning Quarter” and the Merchant City.

These DRFs will be prepared in consultation with the local communities across all four districts to enhance their distinctive local character. To do this, consultants will be working in partnership with residents, businesses, community and civic organisations, as well as, Strathclyde University, Glasgow Caledonian University and the City of Glasgow College. This mix of knowledge and expertise will develop forward-thinking plans to help shape the future of these districts.

The Regeneration Frameworks will create a planning strategy to respond to challenges and opportunities these communities face to enhance the quality of life, health and wellbeing of the local communities, economy and environment.

The DRFs will promote local and large scale projects in an action plan which considers how to fund and deliver regeneration with short, medium and long term aims for each district. The DRFs will be prepared in consultation and cooperation with local communities over the remainder of 2020 and 2021. The intention is that publication will take place in 2022.  Councillor Susan Aitken, Leader of Glasgow City Council and City Convener for Inclusive Economic Growth, said:

“It’s vital that our city centre is equipped for both the structural changes facing our high streets and the need for carbon neutrality within the next decade. These shifts are already creating both challenge and opportunity, and the district regeneration frameworks will give us the blueprints to renew the beating heart of Glasgow. A team of leading experts with international and local experience will assist us in shaping that future, whilst retaining the strengths and character we cherish about each district. We need our communities to come with us so I would urge all those whose neighbourhoods are within the frameworks to get involved in our consultation in the months ahead.”