GLASGOW’S STREET ART IS WELL LOVED ON INSTAGRAM

GLASGOW’S STREET ART IS WELL LOVED ON INSTAGRAM

Guest blog by Leila Jones of WMGlobal

Glasgow is a must-see for any street art fan, with some of the most Instagrammed murals in the country. Talented artists such as Smug and Rogue Oner are decorating the city with inspiring, colourful pieces. Over 12,700 street art posts have been shared in Glasgow, but which pieces of art are most popular on the social network?

1. Saint Mungo by Smug – located on High Street
St Mungo, High Street, Glasgow
Credit: @travljunki
This mural depicts Glasgow’s patron saint, Mungo, in modern-day clothes. It interprets the story of Mungo in the 6th century, when he prayed over a dying bird that some boys had been throwing stones at, and it flew away.

2. Fellow Glasgow Residents by Smug – Ingram Street car park
Fellow Glasgow Residents by Smug – Ingram Street car park
Credit: @rssvision
This mural was commissioned by Glasgow City Council to celebrate some of the wildlife that you will see in Glasgow’s green spaces, such as squirrels, foxes and highland cows.

3. Crazy Cat Lady by Rogue Oner – located on Sauchiehall Street
Crazy Cat Lady by Rogue Oner – located on Sauchiehall Street
Credit: @streetart_guide_vienna
This fun, innocent artwork was commissioned to brighten up a tired area of Sauchiehall Street. The subject is a lady so crazy about cats that she even has Grumpy Cat wallpaper and feline-themed slippers.

4. Saint Enoch and Child by Smug – located on High Street
Saint Enoch and Child by Smug – located on High Street
Credit: @jeroenvanerp
Complimenting the Saint Mungo artwork, this mural is an interpretation of Glasgow’s founding story. St Thenue/Enoch is pictured cradling her child, St Kentigern/Mungo. The image is sweet and moving, which partly contributes to its Instagram popularity – with several Instagrammers stating that it reminds them of their children.
5. Glasgow’s Tiger by Klingatron and Art Pistol – Clyde Street
Glasgow’s Tiger by Klingatron and Art Pistol – Clyde Street
Credit: @alexfwatt
This popular piece was a collaboration by Klingatron and Art Pistol, replacing the former Tiger Beer mural which was commissioned in 2010. The new tiger was initially met with scepticism by residents for being too literal but is now much loved. At the start of September, this mural was mindlessly vandalised, much to the upset of local residents.
You can see all of Glasgow’s top 10 most Instagrammed street art here and see what is most popular in other cities around the North and Scotland.

SAUCHIEHALL STREET: FIRST PHASE COMPLETED

SAUCHIEHALL STREET: FIRST PHASE COMPLETED

The first deliverable of the City Deal Avenues project is now complete. Sauchiehall Street, between Charing Cross and Rose Street, has been transformed – and has also been a useful demonstrator project for this new approach to the public realm and placemaking in Glasgow city centre.

The City Deal Avenues project is a £115 million programme aimed at improving the public realm throughout the city centre. Despite two significant fires affecting the construction programme, this first phase has been a great success. It has provided new high-quality space for pedestrians, a segregated cycle lane, benches and 26 new trees, adding some well-needed greenery to the area. The works have broadened pavements enabling bars and cafes to sprawl on to the street, contributing to the liveliness of the city centre.

The aesthetic of the street has significantly improved. It now has a continental look and feel, which makes the avenue almost unrecognisable from before. See below for images – we hope you are as pleased as we are with the outcome!
Sauchiehall Street Glasgow 2019
Sauchiehall Street at night - Glasgow 2019
Glasgow City Council Leader Susan Aitken said, “The completion of Sauchiehall Avenue is a milestone in the rebirth of this famous Glasgow thoroughfare. It is the first stage in the biggest reimaging and remodelling of our city-centre streets since the pedestrianisation of Buchanan Street 40 years ago.”

“We have improved Sauchiehall Street’s overall look and feel. By helping it adapt to the changes affecting high streets everywhere, we’ve created a catalytic physical environment which will bring social and economic benefits.”

“It is now a street where pedestrians, cyclists and vulnerable road users have priority over the car in a safer, cleaner, more vibrant space. The street is now more attractive to both visitors and investors.”